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Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
October 22, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: warts  

What Causes Warts?

Got foot warts? Nearly everyone will have a wart at some point in their lives. Warts are typically small, hard skin growths caused by an infection with humanpallilloma virus. Foot warts are treatable. Foot warts are among the most common dermatologic conditions podiatrists treat. Read on to learn about the causes of warts.

An HPV Infection

Common warts are caused by by an HPV infection. Over 100 types of HPV exist. Certain types of HPV infection cause cervical cancer. Some types of HPV infection cause foot warts, while others cause warts that appear on the face, neck, or hands. Of the 100 types of HPV, about 60 cause common warts on areas such as the hands or feet.

Skin-To-Skin Contact

Wart viruses are contagious. You can get foot warts from skin-to-skin contact with people who have warts. However, not all HPV strains are highly contagious. You can get the wart virus by touching an object that another person's wart touched, such as clothing, towels, shoes, or exercise equipment.


Breaks in Your Skin

HPV infects the top layer of skin and usually enters the body in an area of damaged or cut skin. Cuts from shaving can provide an avenue for infection. Getting a scrape can also bring on common warts. Foot warts are very common in swimmers whose feet are scratched by rough pool surfaces.

A Weak Immune System

In most cases, your immune system defeats an HPV infection before it creates a wart. Someone with a weakened immune system is more vulnerable and therefore more likely to develop warts. Immune systems can be weakened by HIV or by immunosuppressant drugs used after organ transplants.


If you want to get rid of foot warts, see your podiatrist as soon as possible. Many types of effective wart treatments are available. They include salicylic acid, cantharidin, cryotherapy, laser treatment, and surgery. Your podiatrist can help you get rid of foot warts once and for all!

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
August 28, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bunions   foot pain  

Bunions on FeetBunions aren't always due to poor shoes. They are also hereditary. If you're one of those people suffering from bunions, the podiatrists at Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia in Stafford and Lake Ridge, VA, can offer you some advice.
More on Bunions
If you start to notice the joint of your big toe becoming larger, then you may be forming a bunion. The protrusion of the bunions can be very painful and other issues such as flat feet, foot injuries, and neuromuscular problems may contribute to their formation. The problem with bunions is that they can cause the formation of other toe deformities, such as hammertoes, bursitis, arthritis, and corns and calluses

Here are some things bunions can have an effect on:

  • Walking can be an obstacle because it rubs against your shoes causing friction, pressure, redness, and eventually pain.
  • If the bunion moves towards the second toe and starts to rotate, this is called Hallus Abducto Valgus.
  • The enlargement moves the toe at an angle where it starts bending in towards the rest of the toes.
  • The bunion can also cause the toe to overlap the third toe, which is something referred to as Hallux Valgus.

Dealing with Bunions

  • Make sure to wear shoes that have extra padding. The felt material in the padding creates a protective cushion that reduces friction. This will help reduce the amount of friction and inflammation to your skin.
  • To improve and maintain healthy joint mobility and reduce stiffness, your podiatrist may prescribe exercises.
  • Removing corns and calluses, if they've formed any, can help alleviate some of the issues experienced due to bunions.
  • Your Stafford and Lake Ridge, VA. podiatrist may recommend an orthotic device designed to keep your toe in the proper position.

Bunions are painful to deal with. If you have any questions, or would like to schedule an appointment, just call your Stafford and Lake Ridge, VA.

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
August 16, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Poor Circulation  

Are you experiencing numbness, tingling, or discolorations in your feet?

Even though poor circulation isn’t a condition, if you are experiencing poor circulation in your feet this is often a symptom of a much larger issue. This is why it’s Podiatrist in Lake Ridge, Stafford, VAimportant to understand the warning signs of poor circulation and when to see a podiatrist, as many of these conditions can be serious or cause further complications to your health.

Causes of Poor Circulation

There are many reasons why someone may have poor circulation. The most common conditions include:

1. Peripheral artery disease (PAD)

This causes poor circulation in the legs due to a narrowing in the arteries and blood vessels. Over time this condition can cause damage to nerves or tissue. While this condition can occur in younger people, particularly smokers, it’s more common for people over 50 years old to develop PAD.

2. Blood Clots

A blood clot causes a block or restriction in blood flow and can develop anywhere in the body. The most common places for a blood clot include the arms or the legs, which can lead to symptoms of poor circulation. In some cases, a blood clot can cause serious complications such as a stroke.

3. Diabetes

While this condition does affect blood sugar levels, it is also known to affect circulation within the body. Those with circulation issues may experience cramping in the legs that may get worse when you are active. Those with diabetic neuropathy may experience nerve damage in the legs and feet, as well as numbness or tingling.

4. Raynaud’s Disease

A less common condition, Raynaud’s disease causes chronic cold fingers and feet due to the narrowing of the arteries in the hands and toes. Since these arteries are narrow it’s more difficult for blood to flow to these areas, leading to poor circulation. Of course, you may experience these symptoms in other parts of the body besides your toes or fingers, such as your nose, ears, or lips.

Warning Signs of Poor Circulation

You may be experiencing poor circulation in your feet if you are experiencing these symptoms:

  • Numbness
  • Pain that may radiate into the limbs
  • Tingling (a “pins and needles” sensation)
  • Muscle cramping

If you are experiencing symptoms of poor circulation that don’t go away it’s best to play it safe rather than sorry and turn to a podiatric specialist who can provide a proper diagnosis and determine the best approach for improving circulation. Don’t ignore this issue.

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
July 16, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Foot Injuries  

The feet endure a lot of stress and impact throughout the day with every step taken. Over time, the daily stress can result in the foot injurydevelopment of various foot problems, such as strained ligaments. More strenuous activities, such as running and other types of exercise, can result in a range of foot and ankle injuries. Fortunately, there are treatments that can ease the pain while healing the injury. Our podiatrists at Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia in Lake Ridge and Stafford, VA treat ankle injuries and other foot injuries.

Ankle Injuries

One common type of foot injury is a sprained ankle. Sprained ankles can occur while performing such activities as walking, running, jumping and playing sports. Sprained ankles occur when the ankle twists the wrong way and the ligaments inside become stretched or torn. If not properly headed, an ankle sprain can lead to chronic foot and ankle problems. Treatments for ankle injuries include resting the foot, applying ice to the ankle and wearing compression bandages. In Lake Ridge and Stafford, an ankle injury should be examined by a podiatrist for a treatment recommendation.

Heel Pain

Heel pain is another common type of foot injury. There are different types of heel pain. The two most common types are plantar fasciitis and achilles tendonosis. Achilles tendonosis, also called tendonitis, is associated with pain behind the heel. Plantar fasciitis is associated with pain on the bottom of the heel, as well as the development of heel spurs. Heel spurs occur when calcium deposits form on the bottom of the heel. Heel pain treatment includes resting the foot, wearing orthotic shoe inserts, physical therapy and for more severe cases foot surgery.

Whether you are experiencing heel pain or have sustained an ankle injury, our podiatrists can help. The podiatrists at Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia can diagnose your exact injury and develop the right treatment plan. To schedule an appointment, call the Stafford office at (540) 720-0700 or the Lake Ridge office at (703) 491-9500.

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
July 16, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Ankle Injury  

Severe pain in your ankle is a sure sign you've hurt it, but sometimes the signs are more subtle. The Stafford and Lake Ridge, VA, ankle injurypodiatrists at Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia share a few signs that may indicate that you have an ankle injury and explain how your injury can be treated.

Your ankle is rapidly getting bigger

Inflammation follows damage to your cells. Your body reacts to the inflammation by flooding your injured ankle with white blood cells in an attempt to kill bacteria or stop leakage from the cells. The moment you hurt yourself, your body springs into action, triggering a response called vasodilation. Vasodilation temporarily widens your arteries, allowing more blood and white blood cells to reach your ankle. The response also causes swelling, which can cause your ankle to puff up.

You've got a bruise

Bruises frequently occur if you've hurt your ankle. You may notice a bruise whether you've broken the ankle or sprained it. Bruises also occur due to the sudden surge of blood to the area.

Your ankle just doesn't look right

Your ankle may become deformed if you've broken it or it's been dislocated.

You heard a pop

Sprains are caused by torn ligaments. It's not unusual to hear a popping sound at the moment that the ligament tears.

You can't bend your ankle

Difficulty bending your ankle or foot may occur if you've broken or sprained your ankle.

You put pressure on the ankle

Putting weight on the ankle may be impossible if you've broken a bone or experienced a severe sprain.

Your pain gets better when you stay off your feet

If your pain improves when you rest but gets worse when you walk, you may have a stress fracture. The condition occurs when a small crack develops in a bone due to an overuse injury.

How are ankle injuries treated?

In most cases, wrapping your ankle to reduce inflammation and swelling, applying ice and staying off your feet will improve your symptoms. If it's been a week or two, and your ankle hasn't gotten a better, it's a good idea to call our Stafford or Lake Ridge office. Depending on the cause of your ankle pain, you may need a cast, walking boot, crutches or physical therapy. If your ankle is broken and the bones have moved out of position, surgery may be recommended. Surgery may also be needed if a sprain affects the stability of your ankle joint.

Are you concerned about an ankle injury? Call the podiatrists at Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia at (540) 720-0700 for the Stafford, VA, office or (703) 491-9500 for the Lake Ridge, VA, office.