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Posts for category: Foot Condition

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
December 07, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Sesamoid   Sesamoiditis  

What is Sesamoiditis?

Sesamoids are small bones that are only connected to tendons or surrounded in muscle. This only appears in a few places in the body, one of which is the foot. Two very tiny sesamoids are found in the underside of the foot near the big toe. One is on the outer side of the foot and the other bone is close to the middle of the foot. This structure provides a smooth surface for the tendons to slide over, which helps the tendons move muscles. They help with weight bearing and also help to elevate the bones of the big toe. So now that you know what sesamoids are, you might be wondering what sesamoiditis is and what its symptoms are.

Sesamoiditis

Just like any other bone, sesamoids can unfortunately fracture. The tendons surrounding the sesamoids may also become irritated or inflamed and this is what sesamoiditis is. Sesamoiditis is also a form of tendonitis and is a common condition among ballerinas, runners, and baseball catchers due to the pressure that is constantly placed on their feet.

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis may include:

  • Pain under the big toe or ball of the foot
  • Swelling and/or bruising
  • Difficulty in bending and straightening the big toe

Treating Sesamoiditis

Treatments include:

  • Resting and stopping any activity that could be causing pain and inflammation
  • Anti-inflammatories, such as ibuprofen and aspirin only after consulting your physician
  • Icing the sole of the foot
  • Wearing soft-soled and low-heeled shoes
  • Cushioning inserts in the shoes

If symptoms persist after treatments, you may need to wear a removable brace for 4-6 weeks to help the bones heal. Call your podiatrist today to ask any questions about sesamoiditis and get on your way to pain-free feet once again!

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
October 29, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: ankle pain  

It’s important that you never ignore ankle pain

Is your ankle hurting and you're unsure why? Well, you’ve come to the right place! After all, there are many issues that could be causing your ankle pain and it’s important that you get to the bottom of the problem so that you can allow it to heal properly. Read below to learn more about ankle pain and find out when it’s time to visit our Stafford, VA, podiatrists for care.

Sprained Ankle

If you sprained your ankle, you have overstretched or even torn the ligaments that are attached to the anklebones. Along with pain you may also notice bruising or swelling around the ankle. In some cases, you might not be able to put weight on the foot without it causing you pain.

  • How to Treat It: Sprains are minor and, as a result, usually don’t require more than simple at-home care. The best way to treat a sprained ankle is with the RICE method, which stands for rest, ice, compression, and elevation. These treatment options will help reduce pain and inflammation which is crucial if you want the foot to heal quickly. Minor sprains often go away in a few days.

Ankle Fracture

There are three bones within the ankle. If one or more break, you will immediately notice pain, swelling, and bruising around the ankle. You may even hear an audible pop or snap the moment the fracture occurs. The ankle may be tender or it may be difficult to walk on the foot.

  • How to Treat It: Your foot doctor may give you prescription pain relievers to help manage pain. You may also have to wear a splint or cast to protect the ankle until it heals. Rest is key to making sure your ankle makes a full and swift recovery. Just like with a sprain, it’s important to follow the RICE method. Only in rare cases is surgery necessary.

Arthritis

If you are dealing with persistent pain in both ankles along with stiffness or swelling in the feet, you may be dealing with rheumatoid arthritis, an immune disorder that affects the joints. If you suspect that you might have arthritis, it’s important to visit our Stafford, VA, foot doctor right away for an evaluation.

  • How to Treat It: Even though there is no cure for arthritis, our foot and ankle specialists can provide several treatment options that can reduce the severity of your symptoms. Medications along with prescription orthotics, special exercises, physical therapy, and certain lifestyle modifications can help you manage arthritis for life.

Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia is proud to serve the Lake Ridge and Stafford, VA, areas. If you are dealing with ankle pain, it’s important that you find out what’s going on. Call our office today to schedule an appointment with us. We are here to help.

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
July 16, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Arch Pain  

Find out what might be to blame for your arch and heel pain and how to alleviate it.Arch Pain


Are you sick and tired of dealing with painful, aching heels and arches? Wondering what could have caused this issue and what you can do to make it go away? From the office of the Lakeridge and Stafford Foot & Ankle Centers podiatrists, find out the most common causes of arch pain and what you can do about it.

Since the purpose of the foot arches is it to help stabilize your foot while moving around and take on some of the shock absorption and stress placed on your feet throughout the day, it’s no wonder that sometimes we are faced with arch pain. In many cases, arch pain can often signify that one or more of the muscles, ligaments or tendons around the arch have been overworked, are experiencing more wear and tear than normal, or that you may be taking on too much activity too quickly.

You may also be prone to arch pain if you also suffer from flat feet, plantar fasciitis or if you pronate (when your foot rolls inward as you walk).

Does arch pain require treatment?
If you are dealing with any kind of foot pain, the last thing you should do is just ignore it. Since arch pain can be due to too much stress being placed on certain bones, muscles or tendons of the foot, if the problem is left untreated it can lead to a variety of other problems such as knee and back pain, hammertoes, bunions, heel pain, Achilles tendonitis or even stress fractures.

How is arch pain treated?
A lot will depend on the cause of your arch pain, but we will determine what options will work best for you, which may include:

  • Taking prescription anti-inflammatory medications to reduce inflammation 
  • X-rays of the feet to determine if a heel spur is causing the problem
  • Performing doctor-recommended exercises and stretching  to strengthen the muscles of the feet, which can prevent further injury or problems in the future
  • Wearing arch supports  or possibly custom orthotics to provide further support and cushioning for tender, sore arches
  • Wearing shoes that also offer strong  support for your day-to-day activities, whether you stand a lot for work or you are an athlete
  • Applying an ice pack under the arches of your feet to alleviate pain and swelling

Don’t let foot pain keep you from what you love to do. Call The Lakeridge and Stafford Foot & Ankle Centers today to find out how we can help. Our Board Certified Foot & Ankle specialists can provide you with the treatment you need to get back on your feet. Call Today!

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
May 03, 2017
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Bunions  

BunionsA bunion is an abnormal, bony prominence that develops on the joint at the base of your big toe. As the big toe joint becomes enlarged, it forces the toe to crowd against your other toes, and the pressure exerted on your big toe joint results in inflammation and pain. Early treatment is necessary to decrease the risk of developing joint deformities.

Bunions develop due to prolonged abnormal pressure or motion on your big toe joint, most often caused by inherited structural defects, poor-fitting shoes, foot injuries, or congenital deformities. Women are generally more prone to bunions because of the shoe types typically worn, such as high-heels and narrow-toed shoes.

Bunion pain can range from mild to severe, often making it difficult to wear shoes and perform normal activities. You should contact our office if you notice the following symptoms:

  • An enlarged, visible bulge on your big toe joint
  • Restricted movement of your big toe or foot that prevents you from performing normal activities
  • Irritation, corns or calluses caused by the overlap of the first and second toes
  • Frequent pain, swelling or redness around your big toe joint

Treatment For a Bunion

Treatment for a bunion will vary depending on its severity. Identifying the condition in its early stages is important to avoid surgery, with the main objective of early treatment being to relieve pressure and stop the progression of the deformity. Many times conservative treatments, such as padding, modified footwear or orthotic devices can be highly effective for preventing further growth and reducing the pressure and pain.

We recommend the following for reducing pressure and pain caused by bunions:

  • Wear comfortable shoes that don't cramp or irritate your toes and avoid high-heeled shoes
  • Apply ice to reduce inflammation and pain
  • Our podiatrists can show you how to apply padding to your foot to place it in its normal position and reduce stress on the bunion

When early treatments fail or the persistent pain associated with your bunion is interfering with your daily activities, a surgical procedure may be recommended as a last resort to realign the toe joint and alleviate the pressure. We can advise you on the best treatment options available to relieve pressure on the bunion and slow the progression of the joint deformity.

By Associated Foot & Ankle Centers of Northern Virginia, PC
April 19, 2017
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Bone Spurs  

Bone SpursBone spurs, also known as osteophytes, can occur anywhere in the skeletal system, and the feet are no exception. Bone spurs are simply overgrowths of bone, which most commonly form where two bones come together. Normally bone spurs in the feet are painless, but when exposed to pressure, they can cause the excess bone to rub against other nerve endings or soft tissues, resulting in pain.

Causes of Bone Spurs in the Feet

When your feet are repeatedly exposed to excessive pressure and stress, a bone spur can form as a result of the body's normal response to repair itself. The following activities and conditions are common causes:

  • High-impact activities, such as running
  • Excessive weight
  • Poor-fitting footwear
  • Tightening of the plantar fasciitis due to excessive stress
  • Aging

Because there are no obvious symptoms associated with bone spurs in the feet, diagnosing the disorder can be difficult. Some people experience unbearable pain in particular areas of their foot when exposed to pressure, which prompts them to seek medical care. Other people can go long periods of time without realizing they even have a bone spur. An x-ray can identify a bone spur in your foot, but if it isn't causing you pain, damaging other tissues or restricting your movement, treatment probably won't be necessary.

Identifying the cause of your bone spur, such as poor-fitting shoes or weight gain, is often times enough to reduce the pressure that is causing the pain.

Conservative treatments for bone spurs include:

  • Change in footwear
  • Weight loss
  • Padding or insoles
  • Deep tissue massage and stretching

If you're experiencing chronic foot pain, schedule an appointment at our office. We'll carefully examine your feet and evaluate your symptoms to better understand your condition. If you've developed a bone spur, we can work with you to create a treatment plan that best fits your needs and puts an end to your frustrating foot pain.